Nafplion Excursion

Nafplion Excursion

Nauplion, (pronounced Nafplion) has temporarily been the capital shortly after the Greek War of Independence. Capodistrias, the first head of state after independence was murdered here in 1831. Today it is a simple and cozy place. Because of the proximity of antique places Mycenae, Tiryns, Argos and Epidaurus, Nafplion is also an important tourist center. The marble surfacing in the center and the remarkably homogeneous architecture make Nafplion by far the most elegant town of Greece.

The town is overlooked by a large and majestic fortress, the Venetian-Turkish fortress Palamidi (1711-1714) at an altitude 229m. It is said that the stairs to the fortress consist of 999 steps, and as such a day trip to the fort becomes a sporting affair. Furthermore, the cityscape is dominated by two other impressive buildings: the rocky plateau Akronauplia (ie the acropolis of the ancient city, and the reinforced Bourzi island.

Since the Venetian period, the central square (Platia Syntagmatos) is the center of public life. This beautiful cobbled square is surrounded by numerous cafes and eateries and still looks just as it did in the 18th century. The Turks built a few mosques in those days, of which the one on the east side of the square is now become a cinema. In the mosque on the south side (also called Vouleftikó (council)) in 1822 the first Greek Parliament met for the first time. Also the court that sentenced Kolokotronis resided here. Most streets in the vicinity of the square are narrow and connected by stairs. Several Turkish fountains, with Arabic inscriptions, recall the fact that Nafplion was once a Turkish / Ottoman town.

 

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